Do you guys know how hard it is to find information on alleviating the aches and pains of carrying around heavy breasts? Nobody look at my browser history for a minute.

Like many women who are “blessed” with a very large bustline, I developed early, which is exactly when my bad posture habits began. When you’re still a kid, you’re not all about drawing attention to your body. So I covered up with large clothes, slouched to hide myself as best I could, and avoided activities that involved jumping around. I really avoided physical activities in general until I was in my 20’s.

When I began practicing yoga in a studio in my mid 20’s, I wasn’t surprised to see a whole bunch of bodies that looked nothing like me. When I started CrossFit at age 30, I wasn’t surprised that there were certain activities I wasn’t fond of due to what my coach would simply refer to as my “anatomy.”

What I was surprised about were these weird movement and pain patterns I started to discover in myself. My overhead shoulder position is poor, and I started to notice anterior shoulder pain when I worked on overhead lifts. I sought out resources. I learned about mobility and started to figure out what was going on in my upper body.

Then I found Yoga Tune Up®, and everything got real nerdy. The upper edge of my trapezius and my neck extensors are what hurt all the time. My thoracic spinal rotation is limited. My humeri sit well in front of where they should. My Yoga Tune Up® Therapy Balls became my favorite tools for working on myself.

I’ve developed a bit of a protocol for working on correcting the posture and pain issues wearing these heavy appendages on the front of my chest have caused. First up, my busty legion, a bit of restorative yoga (yay!).

Let the weight of your arms un-do some of what the weight of your chest does to your posture all day!

Let the weight of your arms un-do some of what the weight of your chest does to your posture all day!

Set one yoga block at the tallest height, and one at the second/medium height. Post up a bolster on the little set of steps you’ve just created. Your move is easy: scoot right up to the base of the bolster, and lie back. Do whatever you want with your legs.

This easy restorative move rests the scapulae against the bolster, allowing the pectorals and musculature of the anterior shoulder to be affected by the weight of the arms. The humeri settle into the back of the joint, and the head and shoulders passively assume the opposite position they generally take as you fight with what’s pulling on the front of your torso all day.

Stay tuned for Wednesday’s blog when I’ll outline the protocol I utilize for myself to alleviate the pain and mobility issues I have come to associate with my “anatomy.”

Enjoyed this article? Read Leave Your Rounded Shoulders at your Desk
Tiffany Holmes

I'm Tiffany! A technical writer, yoga teacher, and CrossFitter in the bustling metropolis of Fort Wayne, Indiana. I like moving, breathing, lifting heavy things and putting them back down, falling off of my bike, cooking and then eating what I cook, knitting, dorking around in the woods, petting dogs, and a bunch of other things. I try to help people to move better and understand how they are put together.

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Katelyn K Natalie

Boy am I glad to have found your series Tiffany. I’ve always been a decent size; nothing that was too hard to manage… but now that I have birthed and breastfed two babies,
I would put myself in the category of busty. I find that I am experiencing the same things that you were… compounded by the hunching of infant care and breastfeeding. This restorative pose is one of my faves and I will add it back into my self care rotation. Thanks!

Kate Clark

I have no experience with having this shape, so I feel like I don’t fully understand the needs of some of my massage clients – this is helpful, and I’m looking forward to reading the sequels to this article. Thanks!

Julieann

I was shocked that there is not more info on this topic. I have the worse time with this. I am excited to try this restorative pose as soon as I get to the studio. I think I might get instant relief.

Erin Kintzing

I love this! I suffer from some of the same symptoms (forward head posture, lengthened and weak neck extensors, tight pecs), and I never think of simple restorative postures I can do to help relieve the pain after a long day. Thanks so much for the reminder and recommendation!

Sarah Pluscarr

This is amazing! I have been having neck and upper back pain and never thought it was associated with my busty-ness. But this makes so much sense! No wonder I love restorative yoga so much- it’s finally allowing a counter balance for all the weight on my front. Ha!

Charmaine Garry

I will be passing this information along and using the techniques with my well-endowed clients. Thank you for writing this article!

MC

I’d love to see more information for our uniquely endowed population–thanks!

Vanessa Boivin

Great blog! Subject that affects so many women and is sadly not much addressed. I have many clients with large busts and I will certainly add this to my classes! Thanks!

Ariane Fournier

Article super intéressant! On voit vraiment l’efficacité que le Yoga Tune Up peut avoir sur les gens. Tellement de personnes dans notre société actuelle ont une mauvaise posture en lien avec de mauvaises habitudes ou autres. Cette pose a l’air vraiment super je l’essayerai certainement 🙂

Karlene Capozzolo

I love this site! This page is so informative ! The creativity of the poses is amazing! Thanks for sharing all of this valuable info!

Évelyne Paquin

Plus jeune je n’étais pas tellement à l’aise dans mon corps. J’ai longtemps eu du mal a assumer la taille de poitrine. Je crois que ma timide et mon inconfort en sont venus à créer un enroulement de mes épaules vers l’avant comme si voulais me faire toute petite. Merci pour votre témoignant je compte bien essayer cette posture à la maison!

Samesies

Thanks so much for writing this, Tiffany. I have struggled with the same challenge in those same arenas. Additionally, I have TMJ. The constant tension in my head and neck compounds my issues. Yoga Tune Up and other mobilization programs have meant the difference between continuing to move and grinding to a halt some days. A friend of mine had breast reduction a few years ago because the pain and movement restrictions made her feel trapped by her own body. Strength training and yoga can help women improve their posture and keep moving with their natural anatomy. Without self care,… Read more »

Desiree Nett

I too have to make some adjustments for the “girls” while I’m twisting or squeezing my arms together in front of me. Of course our upper backs need extra love from counter balancing the weight and what a great idea making a little lounger to make rolling out this area even more enjoyable!