Once upon a time, I went to a cadaver lab. I never imagined I would go to a cadaver lab when I became a yoga teacher!

This blog was inspired by a  yoga podcast with guest Ann Votaw. Ann discussed her tour of a cadaver lab at NYU. Her interest was piqued when she became ill, and the possibility of death hit close to home. She decided to attend a cadaver memorial, where families meet the doctors who are learning with these forms. It’s a powerful and beautiful reminder that bodies can be honored in the present moment and beyond.

The amazing human form

The amazing human form

In my first training, which was VERY solid in the land of mass-marketed teacher training programs, we learned anatomy. We had our 12 required hours, and I memorized the bones that I needed to memorize for the anatomy portion of the final exam. Anatomy is such a minimal portion of trainings which makes me really sad because we deal with bodies. And then there’s biomechanics – which is not even discussed in most trainings. I’m lucky enough to have studied with teachers who are bringing this information to teachers. I’m grateful for any and all that I can learn about the body as it helps me show up for whoever shows up in my classroom.

But once upon a time, I got to attend a one-day cadaver lab at a local college here in Los Angeles. I was so nervous to go. I am not a super woo-woo teacher, but at that time, I was definitely more chakras and Chodron than Latin and lats. I was nervous about seeing the bodies, let alone touching the bodies.

I was told to wear layers, lots of layers, because it’s very cold in the lab. I was told to wear clothes, including shoes that would most likely be thrown in the garbage, once we got home, of course 😉 I was told to get gloves. I was warned about the formaldehyde smell. I was told to bring a lunch…an interesting roam around Trader Joe’s, wondering what kind of lunch I might be able to eat or if I’d be tossing my lunch.10

This tale is continued on Friday! Check back then.

Enjoyed this article? Read Anatomy in the Real World